poll-tax in New Zealand
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poll-tax in New Zealand

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Published by Office of Ethnic Affairs, Dept. of Internal Affairs in Wellington, N.Z .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • New Zealand

Subjects:

  • New Zealand.,
  • Poll tax -- New Zealand -- History.,
  • Emigration and immigration law -- New Zealand -- History.,
  • Chinese -- New Zealand -- History.,
  • Immigrants -- New Zealand -- History.,
  • Race discrimination -- New Zealand -- History.

Book details:

About the Edition

Relates to the entry tax imposed on every Chinese immigrant to New Zealand, 1881-1934.

Edition Notes

Other titlesNiuxilan ren tou shui
Statementa research paper by Nigel Murphy ; commissioned by the New Zealand Chinese Association Inc. = Niuxilan ren tou shui / Mailizu ; You Niuxilan Hua lian zong hui wei ren jin xing yan jiu.
ContributionsNew Zealand Chinese Association., New Zealand. Office of Ethnic Affairs.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHJ4936.N45 M87 2002
The Physical Object
Paginationvi, 146 p. :
Number of Pages146
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3374655M
ISBN 100478092806
LC Control Number2004463574

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STARCH WORK BY EXPERTS: CHINESE LAUNDRIES IN AOTEAROA NEW ZEALAND. The Chinese Poll Tax Heritage Trust commissioned this special project to document the stories of early New Zealand Chinese settlers.. Hand laundries were one of four main occupations for early Chinese settlers, along with mining, market gardening and storekeeping. New Zealand imposed a poll tax on Chinese immigrants during the 19th and early 20th centuries. The poll tax was effectively lifted in the s following the invasion of China by Japan, and was finally repealed in On 12 February , Prime Minister at the time Helen Clark offered New Zealand's Chinese community an official apology for the poll tax. Chinese Poll Tax Heritage Trust, Wellington, New Zealand. likes 39 talking about this. This Trust provides funding to help strengthen the unique identity of Followers:   Certificates of Registration and Poll Tax Registrations Topic These files held at Auckland Archives date from to Most files contain two formal photographs, two copies of the Certificate of Registration, and a hand ruled sheet filled in on return to New Zealand with the Chinese and English signatures (if possible), thumb prints, name of ship and date of arrival.

A ‘poll tax’ of £10 a head (equivalent to $1, in ) was introduced, and ships arriving in New Zealand were restricted to one Chinese passenger per 10 tons of cargo. In this ratio was reduced to one passenger to tons of cargo, and the poll tax was increased to £ ($19,). New Zealand imposed a poll tax on Chinese immigrants during the 19th and early 20th centuries as part of their broader efforts to reduce the number of Chinese immigrants. The poll tax was effectively lifted in the s following the invasion of China by . The Association, [] By: Murphy, Nigel, Description: Relates to the entry tax imposed on every Chinese immigrant to New Zealand, The poll-tax in New Zealand: a research paper = Niu xi lan ren tou shui yan jiu bao ga.   I became curious about the poll tax when a customer requested a book by Nigel Murphy called 'The Poll Tax in New Zealand' (). The research and writing of this book was commissioned by the New Zealand Chinese book highlights the NZ government's involvement in discrimination against Chinese settlers and the hardships they .

  The Tragi-comedy of the NZ Chinese Poll-Tax Issue Background to the NZ Government's Apology David Fung Wellington In the early 's many Chinese notably from Taiwan and Hong Kong immigrated to New Zealand and most settled in Auckland. This gave rise to a great deal of anti-Chinese feeling based on latent xenophobic sentiments. The poll tax is symbolic because it was the first time that restrictions were put on immigration to New Zealand and was part of the project of the creation of New Zealand’s national identity. For many Chinese New Zealanders, the poll tax symbolises all the legal discriminations that were imposed on them, and by extension, all the racism they. The poll tax Although Chinese miners had been welcomed when there was a shortage of labour, anti-Chinese prejudice soon resurfaced. By there were calls for Chinese immigration to be restricted. Like the other British colonies of Canada and Australia, New Zealand imposed an .   The first edition was commissioned by the New Zealand Chinese Association and published in "The Poll Tax in New Zealand: A Research Paper", by Nigel Murphy, contains a list of some 2, Chinese people who paid the tax at Wellington between the years and It is the largest and most complete listing of poll tax payers.